Just finished gauge cluster LED conversion!

SickEk

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my local walmart has the paint in stock in red, orange, green and yellow. check out yours because it really isnt expensive at walmart either.
 

kidsamston

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hey what is the advantages or disadvantages of just replacing the stock cluster bulbs with LED's?
 


Genuine Rolla

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hey what is the advantages or disadvantages of just replacing the stock cluster bulbs with LED's?
Advantages:

quicker to install.
A lil more $$ but worth it.
BRIGHT.

Disadvantages:
Can't really dim them with the OEM dimmer.
 

XpL0d3r

I had a Civic once.
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Disadvantages:
Can't really dim them with the OEM dimmer.
I didn't know that. I am going to replace my bulbs soon too. I have mine dimmed all the way down, because I have blue underseat neon and the brightness takes away from it. I did it the right way though, not the rice way. switched, fused, hidden wires.. etc.

/hijack
 


mrmarc

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Great DIY write-up. I don't mean to bump an old thread, but I'm curious how the OP (or anyone else who's attempted this) got the LED's through the rubber tubing. I picked up an 8' pack of airline tubing (air hoses for aquariums) at Walmart. I'm thinking of heating the leads of the LED's, but I'm concerned about damaging the LED's themselves.

Thanks.
 

mrmarc

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Although this is a bit off-topic, I just thought I'd add that you want to be careful not to over-tighten the screws that connect the gauges to the cluster housing when you are putting them back in. You may snap one of the thin copper wires like I did. I ended up having to solder it back together. In case you do have to do this, go easy. You don't want to burn the wire at the solder point, and make sure there is a good mechanical connection between the split before applying the solder.

This happened to my fuel gauge, and it was pegged at full even though I knew I had only about a quarter tank of gas in my car. I looked it up online, and everywhere I went, the solution was to replace the gauge. I was just about to go to the pick-n-pull to find a replacement when I noticed the broken wire. That's when I decided to try and repair it myself first.



After a quick bit of soldering, my fuel gauge is once again working. :D
 

takeachance

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if you sand the tip of the LED down it will spread the light out more thus no hotspots
 

takeachance

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it wont be a spot shining anymore it will spread it out more or diffuse as you called it. It will help i did it to mine and have no hotspots what so ever
 

Rountreesj

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dsam...i did this in red on my car. looks clean too. Go on ebay they have strip lights in white, red, yellow, orange, blue...etc. Flexible. Get three fit them into place. splice them into the dimmer switch, put a heavier fuse in...vualla...amber lights. None of this aquarium tubing, etc. and you can dim them too...and no hot spots if you rout the lights correctly...you want it in an arc bigger then the gauge, so it illuminates it...but doesn't shine through the holes. also ^^^ be careful not to take any needles off or tighten the screws so tight as to break the little copper wire. and the back side of the gauge has darker spots, gently sand these off to get an ever dispersion of light. mine is awesome...though during the bright day, it looks pink, and the needles don't glow.

I want someone to find out how to get the needles to glow, not just painted.

sorry for the hijack...
 

Kloan

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What bulb type are the two top ones that shine down on the needles? Are they also #74?
 

_michael_

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My results

Not to dig up an old thread (seems to keep happening with this one), but I did this light swap and figured I would post pics.

I used 4 tri-power blue #74 LEDs and 1 Supernova-Matrix blue #194 LED from autolumination.com for the backlighting. Then I cut out the blue filters up top and replaced the bulbs that light up the needles with 2 red incandescent bulbs, also from autolumination. There is some red glare, and the needles aren't quite as red as I would like, but I think they look pretty good overall.

Also mounted some blue LEDs in the cupholders with momentary push buttons for each individual bottle, an indicator light on the dash, and a system on off switch in the center console.







 

zammykoo

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holy smokes! this thread is still up? lol

well i have recently redid my gauge cluster with better led strips and relocated the UV led's so looks much better.

I am also planning on fabricating a fiberglass piece that mounts to the bezel (this piece will house the UV led's, so they will actually be OUTSIDE of the cluster)

will post pics when i get a chance
 

_michael_

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holy smokes! this thread is still up? lol

well i have recently redid my gauge cluster with better led strips and relocated the UV led's so looks much better.

I am also planning on fabricating a fiberglass piece that mounts to the bezel (this piece will house the UV led's, so they will actually be OUTSIDE of the cluster)

will post pics when i get a chance
haha, ya sorry to dig up an old one. But I just found it and did the modifications last week.

You painted your needles, right? I just replaced the bulbs with red ones and cut out the blue films. It looks pretty good at night, but in the evening they don't light up very much, and in the day I can't even tell that they are supposed to be red. I'm thinking reflective red paint and UV bulbs is the way to go. Any suggestions?
 



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