Need help rear disc

Arty33

New Member
Hello everyone, just had a rear disc swap done at the mechanics. Issue i have is the pedal goes down pretty far, for it to stop, said he bleed the brakes, i know he didn’t install the proportioning valve from the doner hatch, and the main issue is if i take the car for a ride longer then 25 minutes, the front passenger side rotor is hot that it literally has some smoke coming from the rim, the rim is hot that you cant even touch it. And the other 3 rotors are like a greyish color and the passenger front rotor is like chrome where the pads meet the rotor. It has the factory master cylinder it had when it was drum brakes, i been reading all different posts about rear disc setups, and i’m not sure what the issue is. I cant even drive the car, dont wanna do any more damage. Bought the rear disc setup out of a 95 hatch, not sure what it originally came out of. Brand new rotors front and rear, new pads in rear, new flex hose’s in rear. So not sure why the front passenger gets redhot and not the other 3. No issues with the front brake setup when the drums were in the rear. Car also has integra brake setup in front, was installed when i bought the car 2 years ago, i need your help please. I think it has something to do with the proportioning valve, but i don’t know, thank you all for your help
 

nd4sped

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You need to install the proportioning valve to ensure you have proper braking bias.

Front right sounds like the caliper is locked up. This can be caused by a few things however the most common is failed rubber brake line that has created a one way check valve. This will allow pressure to flow to the caliper, but not back out. Thus pushing the caliper piston out and keeping the brake pads engaged with the rotor. This should also cause some pulling to the right.

Lastly the pedal pressure can a result from the above as pressure is not releasing from the front right brakes keeping fluid locked in that portion of the system. Eventually either the caliper piston boot or brake line with fail causing catastrophic brake failure. Pedal pressure could also be a resuld of the master cylinder not being bench bled properly IF the brake fluid fell below the master cylinder fluid reservoir. This would allow air to entre the master cylinder causing a floppy/soft brake pedal.
 


Arty33

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The mechanic said hes going to try and install the rubber hose first and he’s going to pull the side apart and see if he see’s any sticking pins or brake pads
 

nd4sped

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The mechanic said hes going to try and install the rubber hose first and he’s going to pull the side apart and see if he see’s any sticking pins or brake pads
He should have put brake grease on those pins and the backside of the brake pad as well when he performed the brake job.
 


Arty33

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He didn’t do the front brakes, he only did the rear, and the issue is something going on in the front passenger brake set up some where, it had no issue when the rear was drum , brakes, it gets hot after about 30 minutes of driving, you can smell the pads and the heat. Not sure if its the proportioning valve or just something wrong with the caliper.
 

nd4sped

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If its only one caliper is most likely the caliper or brake line. You dont have ABS so no worries on a clogged ABS manifold.
 

Arty33

New Member
Mechanic put, the rubber hose on, and no improvement, still getting hot, he’s going to replace the caliper tomorrow, i’ll let you lnow how that works out.
 

Arty33

New Member
He replaced the caliper, and boom, no more heated up rim or smell, now just gotta get some better brake pedal, goes to far down for my liking
 

nd4sped

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If the pedal is going to the floor the system needs to bled in complete. You can do this yourself very easily.

As long as your mechanic did not let the master cylinder run dry you wont need to bleed the master cylinder. However if he did there will always be air in the master cylinder causing a very soft pedal.

First off though, you want to begin bleeding the vehicle from the caliper furthest from the master cylinder. In this case, the passenger rear. Then the rear driver, passenger front and finally the driver front. This prevents air from pushing back into the backend of the brake system during the bleeding process.

To do this alone, get some vacuum line, 16oz bottle and a 10mm flare wrench. Pour fresh DOT3 brake fluid into the bottle, half full. Attach vacuum hose to the brake bleeder, place other end of vacuum line into the bottle with brake fluid. Now go pump the brake pedal manually until no more air comes from the rear caliper. Make sure to top off the master cylinder between pumping sessions and NEVER left the fluid drop below the reservoir.

You can monitor this by pumping the brake and checking the bottle for air bubbles. You may also see a lot of nasty brake fluid pump out. This is normal to see dirty fluid come out. Also while you pump the brake, the line in the fluid will allow air to go out, and suck fluid back in. DO NOT AT ANYTIME remove the vacuum line before tightening the bleeder valve. If you do, air will reenter the caliper and you will need to repeat the process.

Once you finish one caliper and are confident that air has been bled from that section of the brake system, move to the next caliper and repeat. Do this process all the way around the car and always monitor the reservoir fluid level. Basically, if you get out of the car, check the fluid level during the process and add as needed.
 


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