Reference: Suspension And Spring Rate Information



Myogi_Nightkid

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#1
got this from Jonas of CHB months ago and i'm sure some of the CHB members here have read it:

Spring rates are basically determined by "pounds per inch". Say a spring is listed at 300 lbs. This means it takes 300 pounds of force to compress the spring 1 inch. Then there's linear and progressive rate springs. Progressive rate springs are nice and comfortable for the street car because as the car turns-in, the spring will compress easily (say 200 lbs per inch), and then get stiffer as it compresses more (say 400 lbs per inch at max). A linear rate is what racecars like because there's no guessing and weird progression feel. I don't want to be in the middle of a corner and all of the sudden my springs get harder. I want full compression rate right now.

The ideal spring rates depend on the weight of the car, what you're doing with it, and how stiff you like it. Assuming you have a 2000 Si model, a popular spring combo is 350 front, 400 rear. Lots of people also like to have the higher rate spring in the front. The Civic will understeer ... period. This is safe, but it's also slow on the track. Ways to help bring the car to a more neutral level is to install the higher rate springs in the rear, remove or reduce the size of the front anti roll bar, and add big anti roll bars in the rear. Again, it's all about what you want and what you feel safe in.

People that typically complain about a bouncy ride, are people with unmatched springs and shocks. Say the KYB adjustable shocks can handle a 350 pound spring. If you put a 500 pound spring on them, you're asking for trouble. The shock "dampens" the spring compression (bump) and rebound, therefore they are referred to as dampers. When the wheel hits a bump, the spring will compress and then rebound. You ideally want a "fast bump" and a "slow rebound" so the tire to follow the countours of the pavement without leaving the surface. So, if the shock can't handle the spring rate, you're overheating your shocks and the ride quality suffers.

Not sure what all the hype is about pillow ball mounts, but they're not necessary for our cars and they do nothing from what I can tell. Different shock body material is a cost vs. need thing. You don't need aluminum shocks unless you're building a full on racecar and need every single ounce of weight savings. This whole thing about rusting steel shocks is crap. Factory shocks are steel, Koni's are steel, TrueChoice shocks are steel, Tokico's are steel....see where I'm going? I just don't buy into all the hype about all the overseas suspension manufactures. As far as I'm concerned, you're wasting your money twice. First, they cost way too much. Second, when you blow a damper, who's going to repair it? You have to ship it overseas and wait 4 months for a replacement. If you have teo grand to spend on suspension, TrueChoice and Advanced Design are every bit as good (if not better) and won't screw you on repairs or service.


anyone want to make this a sticky? 8)
 


SickCiViC

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#5
most will say it right on the spring, i believe..

but if u r talkin bout stockies, i got no clue....... :|
 

shaundrake

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#13
I think you want a medium to soft bound on the front, a stiffer rear bound, really stiff front rebound, and medium stiff rear rebound. To just say "soft bound, stiff rebound" for a front wheel drive car... I don't think that's good advice.

Leave your front sway bar alone, don't remove it. Just get the stiffest rear sway bar with some urethane swaybar bushings for the rear, and a lower tie rod brace for the rear and upper strut brace for the front and rear.

I can't recommend spring rates without knowing the front to rear weight distribution.

But other than that, yeah good advice.
 

silverctr

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#14
Originally posted by shaundrake
I think you want a medium to soft bound on the front, a stiffer rear bound, really stiff front rebound, and medium stiff rear rebound. To just say "soft bound, stiff rebound" for a front wheel drive car... I don't think that's good advice. blah blah blah
Who gave this advice? I didn't read that anywhere. :what:
 

shaundrake

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#15
I did. Just now. I think you read my post wrong. Where i mentioned advice, I was referring to the original post.
 

grasie5

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#16
I have a 2001 Honda Civic and I want to change my Shocks and Spring. Any ideas or locations on where i can get this. My first time I really need them.Thanyou
Grasie5
 

KwiKinTeG2BdEaLtWiD

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#17
Originally posted by grasie5
I have a 2001 Honda Civic and I want to change my Shocks and Spring. Any ideas or locations on where i can get this. My first time I really need them.Thanyou
Grasie5
first thing you have to ask yourself is what type of driving you will do.

it really depends on your budget. for starters, you could go with the Ground Control Coilover kits and Tokico Illumina Shocks. usually, they go from $500-$900 (depending on where you get it from, try www.groupbuycenter.com) for the whole kit. This set up would be the best bang for the buck. A lot of Autocrossers and SCCA showroom stock class race drivers use this combination. or even better, go with Koni Yellows together with the Ground Controls.

and make sure you get a camber kit, not just to improve the camber but also to prevent tire wear. it would be better to do more research on this before you go out and spend money on a useless set up.
 

grasie5

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#18
SOMETHING TO READ BEFORE YOU MESS WITH YOUR SUSPENSION.

YOUR RIGHT !
I HAVE BEEN SEARCHING ALL OVER TO GET THE RIGHT KIT. THE REASON WHY IS BECAUSE EITHER MY SHOCKS ARE BLOWN OR MY SPRINGS ARE BLOWM IT HAS TO BE ONE OR ANOTHER. THAT'S WHY I WANT TO DO THE WHOLE SET. TRUST ME THE WAY MY CAR DRIVES IS NOT GOOD AND I WANT TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT NOW . I DRIVE MY CAR ALL THE TIME (UNTIL I CAN GET A HOOPTY ON THE SIDE), IT WON'T BE DRIVEN AS MUCH WHEN THAT HAPPENS. MEANWHILE I 'M GOING TO KEEP LOOKING. THANKYOU FOR YOUR ADVICE, I APPRECIATE. IF YOU KNOW OF ANYTHING ELSE HOLLA BACK GRASIE5
 

Kamikaze

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#19
BTW - I'm told that on 5th gens (at least) there is a fair to good chance that the bolts that hold the rear struts to the rear control arms are welded in. (Mine aren't, but a friend's were.) So, you pretty much can't take the bolts out without some serious work/cutting.

Spray the bolts with WD 40 or some other environmentally-unfriendly lube, let it soak overnight, and hope you can get 'em off the next day. ;)

Be sure to check that before you think you've got a simple strut swap...
 




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