Can I use a Auto Engine for a Civic with a Manual gearbox?

a82rivers

New Member
I just purchased my first Civic don’t know too much on the import side I come from a v8 foxbody background anyhow I just picked up a very clean 2000 civic ex red color and 5 speed for very cheap but engine is done blown rod my question is can I just get a 1.6 y8 from a car with a Automatic trans or does it need to be from a manual transmission?
 

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SeanShine

New Member
5+ Year Member
@a82rivers yes the short block (the engine itself) is the same no matter which transmission it came with, However, you'll need to swap a few parts over.

The autos come with a pressure plate, compared to the manuals come with a flywheel.
Also, the EX civics had a slightly different intake manifold. The Manuals came with the idle air control valve on the back of the intake, compared to the automatics had the idle air control valve on the side of the throttle body.

If you still have the original engine, then it should be pretty easy. Just swap the pressure plate for the flywheel, and reuse the intake manifold that came with your car.

A little tip: Most Honda's came with a timing belt, and those belts should be replaced every 100k miles. If you don't know how old the timing belt on your donor engine is, I would recommend replacing it (and the water pump). It's not expensive, and it's 10x easier to do it while the engine is out of the car.

Let me know if you have any more questions!
 


a82rivers

New Member
@a82rivers yes the short block (the engine itself) is the same no matter which transmission it came with, However, you'll need to swap a few parts over.

The autos come with a pressure plate, compared to the manuals come with a flywheel.
Also, the EX civics had a slightly different intake manifold. The Manuals came with the idle air control valve on the back of the intake, compared to the automatics had the idle air control valve on the side of the throttle body.

If you still have the original engine, then it should be pretty easy. Just swap the pressure plate for the flywheel, and reuse the intake manifold that came with your car.

A little tip: Most Honda's came with a timing belt, and those belts should be replaced every 100k miles. If you don't know how old the timing belt on your donor engine is, I would recommend replacing it (and the water pump). It's not expensive, and it's 10x easier to do it while the engine is out of the car.

Let me know if you have any more questions!
Great thanks found quite a few of the engines at my local yard but most were auto I do plan on replacing the clutch and timing belt and wp as well.
 

Mr.Baker

Mr. Search
Registered VIP
5+ Year Member
Yes, you can use a engine from a car with an auto trans.

Does it not work this way with Mustangs?
 


a82rivers

New Member
Yes, you can use a engine from a car with an auto trans.

Does it not work this way with Mustangs?
Thanks, and yes for mustangs or any other v8 engines I’ve worked on it’s been the same was just getting a lot of mixed answers online about these Honda’s at this point not sure if I should just do a swap since my local yard is full of k20 and 24 engines with manual trans for cheap
 

SeanShine

New Member
5+ Year Member
@a82rivers Im not trying to sound offensive at all, but if you are having to ask about whether the auto and manual engines are compatible, then I would recommend against trying to do a K swap. It's not that I don't think you CAN do it. Perhaps you are pretty handy with some wrenches. But once you get into doing a K swap, there is quite a bit of wiring and custom bits that you will need to sort out.

My recommendation would be to replace the D16 engine you currently have, and then start doing a bunch of research. My first Honda engine swap was a HUGE learning curve for me and I learned a ton about these cars after having done the swap. And that was a fairly simple B18B1 swap, with the donor car available for reference.

So, replace the D16 with another D16. Then you can do some more research. It's better to have a running D16 than a car with no engine that might never get finished.
 

Mr.Baker

Mr. Search
Registered VIP
5+ Year Member
So, replace the D16 with another D16. Then you can do some more research. It's better to have a running D16 than a car with no engine that might never get finished.
That's not bad advice, especially if you need the car up and running quick.
A K swap does take a bit more work.
 



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